The LE 306 electro van
In March 1972 Daimler-Benz presented the LE 306 test vehicle, the first electro van with battery exchange technology. It could climb gradients of up to around 16 %, had a range of 65 km on just one charging and was capable of a 70-km/h top speed. The LE 306 was powered by a direct-current shunt motor developing 31 kW (over longer durations) or 52 kW (over shorter durations). In terms of size and equipment, the LE 306 mirrored the L 306 D and was available as a panel van and crewbus with payload of 1.45 t.
The Mercedes-Benz T2 van
A new Mercedes-Benz large-capacity van was presented in Rome between 17 and 22 March 1986. The newly developed T 2 series included the 507 D - 811 D models with permitted gross vehicle weights from 3.5 to 7.5 t. Payload capacity ranged from 2505 to 4635 kg. The wide variety of variants available for even the standard models was another new feature of this large-capacity van range. The basic versions were the pick-up, panel van, tipper and bus. Five engines were available - joined by a sixth option in autumn 1987 - with output ranging from 53 kW (72 hp) to 100 kW (136 hp).
The MB 100 E electro van
With the MB 100 E, Daimler-Benz gave added impetus to the further development of the zero-emission vehicle. The vehicle had a range of as far as 80 km without needing to recharge, boasted a top speed of around 70 km/h and recorded energy consumption of approximately 40 kWh per 100 km. The load area of this electrically-powered variant was no less than that in the standard MB 100. The MB 100 E allowed Daimler-Benz to build on its successful tradition in electro van development.
The Mercedes-Benz L 319
It was immediately apparent that the Mercedes-Benz L 319 van presented in 1955 was derived from neither a passenger car nor a truck. Every aspect of the L 319 was designed with the needs of short-radius distribution in mind and with competitors such as Hanomag and Borgward in the company's sights. Production of the L 319 panel van, pick-up and tipper variants began as early as September 1956 at the Sindelfingen plant. Meanwhile, at the Mannheim plant, the O 319 minibus also went into series production. It was powered by a 32-kW (43-hp) four-cylinder diesel engine, manufactured likewise from 1956.
The Mercedes-Benz L 319
It was immediately apparent that the Mercedes-Benz L 319 van presented in 1955 was derived from neither a passenger car nor a truck. Every aspect of the L 319 was designed with the needs of short-radius distribution in mind and with competitors such as Hanomag and Borgward in the company's sights. Production of the L 319 panel van, pick-up and tipper variants began as early as September 1956 at the Sindelfingen plant. Meanwhile, at the Mannheim plant, the O 319 minibus also went into series production. It was powered by a 32-kW (43-hp) four-cylinder diesel engine, manufactured likewise from 1956.
The Mercedes-Benz L 319
It was immediately apparent that the Mercedes-Benz L 319 van presented in 1955 was derived from neither a passenger car nor a truck. Every aspect of the L 319 was designed with the needs of short-radius distribution in mind and with competitors such as Hanomag and Borgward in the company's sights. Production of the L 319 panel van, pick-up and tipper variants began as early as September 1956 at the Sindelfingen plant. Meanwhile, at the Mannheim plant, the O 319 minibus also went into series production. It was powered by a 32-kW (43-hp) four-cylinder diesel engine, manufactured likewise from 1956.
The Mercedes-Benz L 319
It was immediately apparent that the Mercedes-Benz L 319 van presented in 1955 was derived from neither a passenger car nor a truck. Every aspect of the L 319 was designed with the needs of short-radius distribution in mind and with competitors such as Hanomag and Borgward in the company's sights. Production of the L 319 panel van, pick-up and tipper variants began as early as September 1956 at the Sindelfingen plant. Meanwhile, at the Mannheim plant, the O 319 minibus also went into series production. It was powered by a 32-kW (43-hp) four-cylinder diesel engine, manufactured likewise from 1956.
The Mercedes-Benz L 406 / 408 panel van
In January 1967 Daimler-Benz presented the new L 406 D and L 408 vans built at the Düsseldorf plant. The robust construction of these vehicles stood out in particular. The O 309 minibus was one of the variants produced. The van's flatter bonnet section caught the eye immediately and, needless to say, there were technical highlights to be found under the bonnet, too. The first ever four-cylinder diesel engine had displacement of 1988 cc and developed 55 hp at 4350 rpm, whilst the four-cylinder petrol unit delivered 80 hp at 5000 rpm from identical displacement. The vehicle's innovative modular construction system allowed a wide variety of model variants.
The Mercedes-Benz L 406 / 408 panel van
In January 1967 Daimler-Benz presented the new L 406 D and L 408 vans built at the Düsseldorf plant. The robust construction of these vehicles stood out in particular. The O 309 minibus was one of the variants produced. The van's flatter bonnet section caught the eye immediately and, needless to say, there were technical highlights to be found under the bonnet, too. The first ever four-cylinder diesel engine had displacement of 1988 cc and developed 55 hp at 4350 rpm, whilst the four-cylinder petrol unit delivered 80 hp at 5000 rpm from identical displacement. The vehicle's innovative modular construction system allowed a wide variety of model variants.
The Mercedes-Benz L 406 / 408 panel van
In January 1967 Daimler-Benz presented the new L 406 D and L 408 vans built at the Düsseldorf plant. The robust construction of these vehicles stood out in particular. The O 309 minibus was one of the variants produced. The van's flatter bonnet section caught the eye immediately and, needless to say, there were technical highlights to be found under the bonnet, too. The first ever four-cylinder diesel engine had displacement of 1988 cc and developed 55 hp at 4350 rpm, whilst the four-cylinder petrol unit delivered 80 hp at 5000 rpm from identical displacement. The vehicle's innovative modular construction system allowed a wide variety of model variants.
The L 206 D and L 207, and L 306 D and L307 built on the basis of the F 20 and F 35 Hanomag-Henschel models
In 1949 the Tempo factory (in Hamburg-Harburg) brought a four-wheel drive delivery van with a VW engine onto the market - the Tempo-Matador. This proved to be the predecessor to the Hanomag Matador E, which went into production in 1965. Up to 1970 the Hanomag-Henschel light vans could be ordered with either an English-made Austin carburettor engine or a 2-litre 50-hp diesel engine from Daimler-Benz. January 1972 saw the arrival of a considerably more powerful 2.2-litre 60-hp diesel engine and in January 1973 the light van was given a chassis with a simplified, less complex construction.
The L 206 D and L 207, and L 306 D and L307 built on the basis of the F 20 and F 35 Hanomag-Henschel models
In 1949 the Tempo factory (in Hamburg-Harburg) brought a four-wheel drive delivery van with a VW engine onto the market - the Tempo-Matador. This proved to be the predecessor to the Hanomag Matador E, which went into production in 1965. Up to 1970 the Hanomag-Henschel light vans could be ordered with either an English-made Austin carburettor engine or a 2-litre 50-hp diesel engine from Daimler-Benz. January 1972 saw the arrival of a considerably more powerful 2.2-litre 60-hp diesel engine and in January 1973 the light van was given a chassis with a simplified, less complex construction.
The L 206 D and L 207, and L 306 D and L307 built on the basis of the F 20 and F 35 Hanomag-Henschel models
In 1949 the Tempo factory (in Hamburg-Harburg) brought a four-wheel drive delivery van with a VW engine onto the market - the Tempo-Matador. This proved to be the predecessor to the Hanomag Matador E, which went into production in 1965. Up to 1970 the Hanomag-Henschel light vans could be ordered with either an English-made Austin carburettor engine or a 2-litre 50-hp diesel engine from Daimler-Benz. January 1972 saw the arrival of a considerably more powerful 2.2-litre 60-hp diesel engine and in January 1973 the light van was given a chassis with a simplified, less complex construction.
The Mercedes-Benz TN van
The new TN van model series, which included the 207 D, 208, 307 D and 308 (601 series), made its debut between 25 and 29 April 1977. Although the exterior design of this powerful van took some getting used to at first, it was soon accepted as original and, indeed, practical. The short bonnet allowed convenient access to the engine compartment and the driver's cabin was also easier to climb into. September 1981 saw the addition of the 407 D and 409 D with gross vehicle weight of 4.6 t to the range. From the autumn of that year, the 88-hp five-cylinder diesel engine fitted in the 409 D was also available for the smaller models.
The Mercedes-Benz TN van
The new TN van model series, which included the 207 D, 208, 307 D and 308 (601 series), made its debut between 25 and 29 April 1977. Although the exterior design of this powerful van took some getting used to at first, it was soon accepted as original and, indeed, practical. The short bonnet allowed convenient access to the engine compartment and the driver's cabin was also easier to climb into. September 1981 saw the addition of the 407 D and 409 D with gross vehicle weight of 4.6 t to the range. From the autumn of that year, the 88-hp five-cylinder diesel engine fitted in the 409 D was also available for the smaller models.
80 type 208 test vehicles with methanol/petrol drive systems
80 Mercedes-Benz vehicles, including the 208, were involved in large-scale testing which took place as part of the "Alternative drive systems" project initiated by the German Ministry for Research and Technology. Tests were carried out with the alcohol-based fuel M 15, a mixture of 85% four-star petrol and 15% methanol. The testing was evidence of Daimler-Benz AG's activities in the area of alcohol-based fuels.
Large-scale testing with the Mercedes-Benz 307 E electro van
There were two predominant areas of focus in the development of the Mercedes-Benz 307 E. Firstly, the load area of the electro van, which had to be equal to that of the series produced model; and secondly, the control engineering, which was simplified for the electric drive system. The energy accumulator was arranged in two units, each of 90 volts, under the floor section. This allowed the batteries to be easily removed through the bottom of the vehicle. The results of this large-scale testing showed that, from a technical and economical perspective, the 307 E handled road traffic conditions without any problems.
The Mercedes-Benz MB 100
On 15 January 1987 on the island of Majorca, Daimler-Benz presented the new MB 100 - 180 van series designed for payloads from 1000 to 1800 kg. An MB 100 had been built as early as 1980 by Mercedes-Benz Espana SA. in Vitoria (near Bilbao in northern Spain). In 1986 the van was technically reworked and its styling updated. The MB 100 was available in Germany as a pick-up, panel van and crewbus. All 1987 models were powered by the same 2.4-litre diesel engine with 53 kW (72 hp).
The Mercedes-Benz MB 100
On 15 January 1987 on the island of Majorca, Daimler-Benz presented the new MB 100 - 180 van series designed for payloads from 1000 to 1800 kg. An MB 100 had been built as early as 1980 by Mercedes-Benz Espana SA. in Vitoria (near Bilbao in northern Spain). In 1986 the van was technically reworked and its styling updated. The MB 100 was available in Germany as a pick-up, panel van and crewbus. All 1987 models were powered by the same 2.4-litre diesel engine with 53 kW (72 hp).
The Mercedes-Benz MB 100
On 15 January 1987 on the island of Majorca, Daimler-Benz presented the new MB 100 - 180 van series designed for payloads from 1000 to 1800 kg. An MB 100 had been built as early as 1980 by Mercedes-Benz Espana SA. in Vitoria (near Bilbao in northern Spain). In 1986 the van was technically reworked and its styling updated. The MB 100 was available in Germany as a pick-up, panel van and crewbus. All 1987 models were powered by the same 2.4-litre diesel engine with 53 kW (72 hp).
The Mercedes-Benz T1 van
The T 1 van first presented in 1977 was technically reworked and improved for its relaunch in March 1989. The engineers identified three main targets in the reworking of the T1: improved output, higher speed and lower emissions. The two new engines were awarded the title of "Diesel 1989". The 2.3-litre four-cylinder unit delivered 58 kW (79 hp) and the 2.9-litre five-cylinder developed 70 kW (95 hp).
The Mercedes-Benz T1 van
The T 1 van first presented in 1977 was technically reworked and improved for its relaunch in March 1989. The engineers identified three main targets in the reworking of the T1: improved output, higher speed and lower emissions. The two new engines were awarded the title of "Diesel 1989". The 2.3-litre four-cylinder unit delivered 58 kW (79 hp) and the 2.9-litre five-cylinder developed 70 kW (95 hp).
The Mercedes-Benz T1 van
The T 1 van first presented in 1977 was technically reworked and improved for its relaunch in March 1989. The engineers identified three main targets in the reworking of the T1: improved output, higher speed and lower emissions. The two new engines were awarded the title of "Diesel 1989". The 2.3-litre four-cylinder unit delivered 58 kW (79 hp) and the 2.9-litre five-cylinder developed 70 kW (95 hp).
The NECAR (New Electric Car)
On 13 April 1994 Daimler-Benz unveiled a fuel cell-powered vehicle in the research centre in Ulm, Germany, based on the MB 100 and christened the "NECAR" (New Electric Car). All the vehicle produced in the way of emissions was non-combusted air and steam. The NECAR was developed in close cooperation with the Canadian firm Ballard Power Systems, based in Vancouver.
The Mercedes-Benz 308 E electro van
From the outside, you'd be hard pushed to tell the difference between the 308 E and other conventionally powered Mercedes vans in its class. Only the lack of exhaust pipe gives the game away - the 308 E is emission-free. The water-cooled asynchronous motor receives its energy supply from maintenance-free lead-gel batteries, which store rated energy of 29 kWh from each of their approximately 600 possible charge cycles. A full charging takes some 6 hours with a 380-V three-phase current connection, or around 10 hours with a 220-V alternating current connection. This is sufficient energy for 60 to 70 kilometres of low-noise cruising.